David merkur dating spreadsheet

Despite the problems it’s caused, Lilana Beidaut—a 26-year-old makeup artist who met David online, but never in person, is defending him by saying he was a “really nice guy.” PHOTOS: Celebrity Break-Ups “He’s a smart guy and he wanted to keep track of everything,” she told the Mail Online.

“He wanted to make sure he was approaching the women correctly- they’re all beautiful girls. Instead she is upset with Arielle, the girl who Merkur had initially sent the spreadsheet too.

One of the women rated by a Manhattan investment banker who tallied his dates on a spreadsheet isn’t mad at him — but she’s furious at the woman who made the meticulously detailed list public. ” fumed Liliana Beidaut, a 26-year-old makeup artist who got the highest rating, a 9.5, on the infamous Excel dating scorecard of finance whiz David Merkur, 28. The Romanian-born beauty is one of eight women whom Merkur contacted through in recent weeks — and then entered onto an elaborate spreadsheet with their pictures and a 1-to-10 rating of their appearances.

The spreadsheet went viral on the Internet after Merkur foolishly sent it to one of his dates, a 26-year-old Upper East Side brunette named Arielle.

“I think she was spiteful.” Another woman on the list — whom Merkur described as ‘’jappy” on his chart — told The Post she is horrified that her information was made public. He was nice, and he was trying to keep himself organized.

Merkur, who works for a Park Avenue real-estate finance firm, has apologized for sharing the Excel sheet with Arielle, telling The Post Wednesday it was a “serious lapse in judgment” for which he’s “deeply remorseful.” Beidaut said she feels sorry for Merkur, with whom she has spoken only online and whom she has never met in person. “I think he took that seriously and was really looking for a girl.” Meanwhile, Merkur kept a low profile yesterday, with his boss saying he wasn’t available to talk.

‘SORT’ OF CREEPY: An investment banker kept a color-coded spreadsheet of women he dated — re-created in part and blurred out for privacy here (above) — arranging them by looks, impressions of first dates and interest in future pursuit. Merkur told Jezebel that he sent Arielle the spreadsheet because “she works with spreadsheets a lot, too” and she “seemed like a very sweet girl.” “I won’t be using ever again,” he said.

‘SORT’ OF CREEPY: An investment banker kept a color-coded spreadsheet of women he dated — re-created in part and blurred out for privacy here (above) — arranging them by looks, impressions of first dates and interest in future pursuit. “I screwed some people, and I screwed myself.” Arielle, a Long Island native, couldn’t be reached.

He worked in investment banking at Merrill Lynch right out of college and then for a new Manhattan private-equity firm before landing his current slot as an associate director at Ladder Capital.

Over drinks, Merkur told her about his spreadsheet. “I thought about deleting the names, but figured I might as well give you the whole thing. ” On April 9, Arielle — whom Merkur described in his spreadsheet as “very pretty, sweet & down to earth” with a “great personality” — e-mailed it to her friends with the note: “Wanted to pass this on to you for some monday morning entertainment. On the date, he tells me that he has a spreadsheet for tracking all of the people from Match that are ‘in process.’ Naturally, I tease him and ask him to send me the spreadsheet. Merkur, an associate director in capital markets for real-estate finance firm Ladder Capital, told The Post last night that he was sorry for making the crass document.

Arielle asked to see it — and he e-mailed it to her. I only deleted the non-Match people’s names (at the bottom) since some I’ve known for a long time.” “I hope this e-mail doesn’t backfire, because I really had a great time and hope to hang again soon :),” he added. She added, “For some strange reason, he actually does. “I sincerely regret my serious lapse in judgment in this matter and apologize to everyone,” he said. Suffice it to say, I will never do anything like this again.” He earlier told that he found his handiwork “wacky and quirky and kind of funny.” Merkur argued that his busy job prevents him from remembering the mundane details of his nights out.

More to the point, online dating is a brutal game that happens to lend itself well to being systematized.

For every 10 messages I send on a dating site, I only receive one or two replies.

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