Books about teenage dating violence

Several different words are used to describe teen dating violence. Dating violence is widespread with serious long-term and short-term effects. Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have severe consequences and short- and long-term negative effects on a developing teen.Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to experience the following: Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent.Miles offers thoughtful advice and answers to such questions as: What constitutes violence in teen dating relationships? What are the warning signs that parents and other caring adults can watch for that may indicate a teen is being either abused or abusive? They may not be willing or able to approach family members; they may not know how to start coping with the effects of these traumatizing events.Written by a psychologist who has worked with abused kids and teens for more than a decade, is for adolescents searching for positive ways to deal with their history of abuse.A 2011 CDC nationwide survey found that 23% of females and 14% of males who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who — Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

According to the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, approximately 10 percent of adolescents nationwide reported being the victim of physical violence at the hands of a romantic partner during the previous year.[1] The rate of psychological victimization is even higher: Between two and three in 10 reported being verbally or psychologically abused in the previous year, according to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.[2] As for perpetration rates, there are currently no nationwide estimates for who does the abusing, and state estimates vary significantly.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.

However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

An investigation into why American adolescent girls experience depression, eating disorders, and suicide attempts at increasing rates, this book attempts to deconstruct the "girl-poisoning" culture we live in.

With personal stories and analysis, Pipher details how young women continue to struggle to find their true selves.

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